When trees flourished in Treasure Beach

Treasure Beach Forum: Dem Good ole Days : When trees flourished in Treasure Beach
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Earl M on Monday, August 16, 2010 - 02:03 pm: Edit Post

ANOTHER VALUABLE PIECE BY RAYMOND JAMES

It is difficult for the younger generations to imagine that the entire region was once quite densely treed, until about 65 years ago, when a series of very prolonged droughts started to devastate the area. Many mature trees, brush and scrub bushes perished. In some areas like Lennonís Wood, the trees formed a canopy across the road, timber from the forests were used in constructing the houses. Fishermen used to cut saplings from their backyards to build their fishing traps. In Sandy Bank where I grew up, there were thick woods and abundant floras covering the landscape. Another reason that the foliage was destroyed is that wood fire for cooking was about the only fuel available. As the population increased in the area, so did the need for firewood. Trees were indiscriminately cut down and burned.

- Raymond James


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By turey on Tuesday, August 17, 2010 - 09:19 am: Edit Post

Thanks Earl and Raymond, this confirms what I hear.

Our deforestation can be reversed with a little care and patience.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Enviro on Sunday, August 22, 2010 - 09:20 pm: Edit Post

Were there some species of trees that were growing in Treasure Beach those days that are no longer there? Could we have lost some endemic species entirely because of our poor stewardship of the land?

Actually, I believe an inventory should be done by qualified experts - from the University of the West Indies, for example - to determine which trees or shrubs might exist only in Treasure Beach or in only a few such places, so that efforts might be made to preserve them. Who knows, we just might be saving an important component for medicinal or industrial development in the future.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By turey on Monday, August 23, 2010 - 02:12 pm: Edit Post

There were students ready to do a species count of plants and animals a few years ago Enviro.

I'm sure there are many thesis topics around. I was travelling with a birder friend near Fort Charles, he spotted a strange white dove-like thing that he could not ID. There are trees that I have seen no where else.

Were room and board be made available for a graduate student or two, I could talk to the Dept's again. I'm sure this would involve local students too.

I hope some of the lignum vitae seeds scattered around get collected. I managed a pint without trying. West Indian Ebony seeded in Great Bay at Sam's yard and down the road. This is one of the rarest woods in the exotic woods catalogs, if they can find it. Plant some presents for old age and the grands.

Levon Taylor is the man to see now for local and exotic plants.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Enviro on Monday, August 23, 2010 - 06:36 pm: Edit Post

Thanks, Turey!
Will make some inquiries at UWI and perhaps, UTech, as well. Maybe Northern Caribbean University, which is closer to Treasure Beach, might also be interested.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By freshmint on Sunday, September 19, 2010 - 09:49 pm: Edit Post

the best time to plant trees is 20 yrs ago. the next best time is now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Curious on Monday, September 20, 2010 - 05:59 pm: Edit Post

Please elaborate, 'freshmint'.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sally T on Tuesday, September 21, 2010 - 10:41 am: Edit Post

When someone buys a piece of land and is getting ready to build a house, the first thing that they do is cut down all the trees except the Lignum Vitae. There goes the forest and all the birds who used to be able to live there. Why cut the fowl berry trees? The bald plates love them. What is wrong with leaving all the trees except those that are in the way of where the house will go? The trees give you shade and protection from the strong breeze brought by hurricanes. They turn CO2 into the stuff we breath and add beauty.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thinker on Tuesday, September 21, 2010 - 10:58 am: Edit Post

By the way, the Forestry Department often gives away trees in an attempt to encourage replanting right across the island. The Department might well be interested in a small project in the Treasure Beach area; one in which the appropriate varieties of trees might be made available, perhaps starting with the students at the schools.
They could plant some at the schools, in addition to which each student could be given at least one seedling to plant at home. These could be either fruit trees or ornamental plants.
Imagine what a difference it would make over time if even a fraction of these new trees survive to maturity!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By TB22 on Wednesday, September 22, 2010 - 09:34 pm: Edit Post

I agree with you Sally T, but I have read where trees encourage robbers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carlton Reynolds on Monday, October 11, 2010 - 09:03 pm: Edit Post

So lets cut down all the trees and make robbers extinct!! [edited by TB.Net] Seriously, though, I can remember when Lennon Wood was really a forest and also Old Wharf.
There is a tree, behind the old family house towards the well, which we used to call the olive tree and it had olive-type berries. I wonder if it is still there,and could it be a real olive tree?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carlton Reynolds on Wednesday, October 13, 2010 - 06:33 am: Edit Post

The whole world seem to have gone crazy with "political correctness". A harmless ribbing of someone could lead to a helpful correction, on the other hand,if we are so sensitive as to feelings, then no one will bother to comment. This type of thing could cross the line into hypocrisy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Interested on Wednesday, October 13, 2010 - 10:22 am: Edit Post

The old olive tree was not the real deal. My father had one on his property but with time, it also died. How about Barbery trees? Do they still exist? There was one called the Birch tree, did they grow in Pedro too?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carlton Reynolds on Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 06:55 pm: Edit Post

Maybe Earl can answer this one. There was a tree in Sandy Bank lane, on the left a little beyond the Meeting house going into Sandy Bank. It bore fruits about the size of guineps, and I remember hearing something about getting lock-jaw if you stepped on it. Anyone remember this? What type of tree is/was it? It seems ridiculous now, but as kids we really avoided it.
I am sorry to hear that my olive tree was not.I still aim to find out if its still there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jenny reynolds nelson on Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 01:03 pm: Edit Post

Re trees in TB being born in TB and spending some of my youth in Manchester I see TB as a sweet hard land with the most beautiful fragrant trees. We played games in the moon light with my father Neville Reynolds as ring master which for me was my WINDOW to the world.I write to encourage contiued composting and recycling.Remember utlising manure from the cow goat and chicken pen that produced the sweetest mellons and pease on earth.Please teach our children the joys of our cultre. jenny reynolds nelson


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jenny reynolds nelson on Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 01:31 pm: Edit Post

Re tree cousin Carlton I think the tree you refrence may have been some kind of native cherry.This small tree had red sweet berries and millions of invissible prickles. We would rub our hands in the dirt to get rid of the itch after picking the berries. Just remembering our childhood Jenny Reynolds Nelson.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carlton Reynolds on Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 08:14 pm: Edit Post

Hey Jenny

Madge has my Email address-let me hear from you.
The tree you are referring to is the cow-itch, or coreech as I think we used to say. The one I am talking about is a big tree. Either Miss Evelyn or Miss Mike(I always wonder why we didn't say aunt Mike-could it be because of the name Mike)used to stew the berries -yum yum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justis Jah on Sunday, October 17, 2010 - 04:28 pm: Edit Post

I remember there was a tree call swell hand tree I forget where it was. Don't know why it was name swell hand,


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By nostalgic on Saturday, October 30, 2010 - 11:13 pm: Edit Post

Anyone remembers the Ebony Tree? This was a shrub (scrub?) with tiny leaves, and it grew mostly in the Well Lane (between Sandy Bank and Great Bay). It grew in the dry sandstone and seemingly needed little or no water. At a certain time of the year, every leaf on the tree, and they were numerous, turned a rich orange color! I have seen many Fall foliage here in the U.S.A., but during that short blooming season, the Ebony is the most beautiful I have seen anywhere.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jenny reynolds nelson on Saturday, November 20, 2010 - 08:45 pm: Edit Post

RE THE FRAGILE EARTH:GO GENTLE ALONG LIFE WAYS; GO GENTLE IN SEARCH OF GOOD, STEP CARFULLY ON THE FRAGILE EARTH. REACH FOR THE BLOSSOMS FILLED WITH NECTAR,FEEL THE KISS OF THE RAIN CARESS YOUR LIPS, AND THE SUN WARM UPON YOUR BREAST.GO GENTLE ON THE FRAGILE EARTH SO THE MOSS RAISE DEWEY LIPS TO KISS YOU AS YOU PASS.HEAR YOUR HEART UNITE IN SONG KNOWING THAT YOU AND I AND THIS FRAGILE EARTH ARE ONE.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jenny reynoldsnelson on Saturday, November 20, 2010 - 07:54 pm: Edit Post

e trees I do not remember ebony trees but I do remember a few trees called LOGWOOD small fragerant yellow flowers in spring attracting honey bees.I recall the bark of this tree was boiled to make dyes for wood floors which could cause these trees to die. I hope there are still some in existence


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carlton Reynolds on Sunday, November 21, 2010 - 07:33 am: Edit Post

Nostalgic, could it be what was called pepper-rod (not sure if that's the spelling)?
Jenny the fragile earth exists only in the feeble,febrile minds of fragile folks. The earth is a very tough abiding place which can never be destroyed by feeble man, no matter what the Global Warming experts may tell you....and log-wood trees still exist.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jenny reynolds on Sunday, November 21, 2010 - 02:30 pm: Edit Post

THANKS CARLTON My feeble mind and me just returned from the feeble church where in feeble unison we prayed for the feeble earth and now you tell me I am waisting my feeble time.It is your fault ;you could have told me 40 years ago so could have preserved my feeble mind by not watching those doomsday movies or reading revelations.thanks cuz I was trying to remove U FROM A FEEBLE PICKLE.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By nostalgic on Sunday, November 21, 2010 - 03:14 pm: Edit Post

No, it's not the Pepper Rod Carlton. This is a bigger plant (not too big), with sturdy gnarly trunks, and tiny deep green leaves when not in bloom. It only grows in sandstone or hard clay, and was in abundance on Mass Casha's property in the Well Lane. I'm sure Ebony is not the correct name, but that's what we knew it as. I'll try to remember to take a pic of it when next I'm in Ja and post it here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carlton Reynolds on Monday, November 22, 2010 - 10:17 am: Edit Post

Hey Cuz, yours was not the feeble mind I was alluding to; its the writer of the piece you quoted...I take it it was a quote...or have you been waxing philosophic again? Only the Creator can destroy this planet..,He will not allow us feeble,foolish, fanatical fellows/females(don't want to leave out the feeble ladies) to destroy his master-piece.
Nostalgic: Yes,its me,but no one ever called me that before!! Ever had an unpleasant encounter with a pepperod...not at all nice!!I am looking forward to seeing the picture.
Nobody seem to remember the story of the lock-jaw tree, maybe its a figment of my feeble,febrile mind!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jenny reynolds on Monday, November 22, 2010 - 04:05 pm: Edit Post

HiCUZ nice I did not quoth any one but my own feeble fragile febrile mind.Some day when Ihave the time to sanitise of the names I will post my short story of the button wood tree at TB.NET.That one launched me as an amature.Do not forget I am related to Iris, Vine,Clauff Neville,Roy and to aguy by the name of Carlton Reynolds if you should buck him up tell him me sa walk gentle so de fragile earth wo blista him foot.LOVE u cuz:keep my computer in the kitchen between the fridge and stove to keep track of your antics.I DID NOT KNOW WHAT I WAS MISSING.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carlton Reynolds on Monday, November 22, 2010 - 06:16 pm: Edit Post

Yes cuz, your spelling is atrocious, but so was Einsteins'.. I think...so you are in good company. I seem to have stirred your interest in this site,but they maybe getting tired of us. I think I have too much of uncle Pepper in me! I hope your Buttonwood tree story don't start with...it was under the Buttonwood tree,long, long long long ago...how long I quite forgotten!!!!.Oh, I wasn't aware you had all those degrees,but I am still the brains of the family...I have all 365 of em!!
Ditto!